How Humans and Science Are Helping People Kick Drug Addiction

 
Even those that are incarcerated can help others in breaking drug addiction. A recent story about a man who was incarcerated in a California state prison in inspiring. This man created a group to help inmates kick the drug habit. In the article Via csmonitor.com it says:
 
“It made everybody open up, Wiley said. The room launched into a tell-all discussion about their personal histories with violence. To begin the process of the men making themselves whole again, Wiley encouraged them to dredge up harsh memories and to face their faults head-on.
 
It’s this commitment to transformation that led Wiley, a 46-year-old former inmate with a long-term sentence, to create the Timelist Group, a nonprofit organization that aims to fill the gaps left by the state’s rehabilitation offerings. He started the program 10 years ago while he was in prison and, upon his release in 2012, has expanded its menu of services to support California’s growing number of parolees with reentry.”
 
While people are helping one another to break addiction, science is progressing as well.  In a recent article titled New Treatment “Reverses” Cocaine Addiction In Rats | IFLScience “Drug addiction is a hugely complex condition that is caused by an intricate combination of physiological, psychological, and social factors, all of which makes it extremely difficult to treat. Like many drugs, cocaine leads to an increase in dopamine signaling in the brain’s reward circuit, creating an intense feeling of pleasure. However, repeated use can cause an imbalance in some of the brain regions involved in this circuit, such as the nucleus accumbens.”
 
The article goes on to say drug addiction is a hugely complex condition that is caused by an intricate combination of physiological, psychological, and social factors, all of which makes it extremely difficult to treat. Like many drugs, cocaine leads to an increase in dopamine signaling in the brain’s reward circuit, creating an intense feeling of pleasure. However, repeated use can cause an imbalance in some of the brain regions involved in this circuit, such as the nucleus accumbens.
 
Previous research has shown that these changes occur because cocaine use causes an increase in levels of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which helps to control the growth, development, and connectivity of neurons. Because BDNF works by activating a type of brain receptor known as the TrkB receptor, scientists have in the past attempted to treat cocaine addiction by blocking these receptors.
 
Several studies have shown that inhibiting TrkB activation in the nucleus accumbens of cocaine-addicted rats does indeed alleviate their drug dependence, causing them to stop choosing cocaine-laced water over regular water.”
 
All of this is not only taking place in the United States, but throughout the world.  Below is an excerpt of a film based on a man that adopts children in the Ukraine that have become addicted to drugs.  The headline of the article in which the video appears is Meet the man who adopts Ukraine’s drug-addicted street children – BBC Three
 
The film is called almost holy and is described in the article as “Almost Holy, a new film released this week, by director Steve Hoover and exec producer Terence Malik, portrays the life and work of an extraordinary figure – Pastor Gennadiy Mokhnenko. This is documentary, weaving archive and original captured footage, but Gennadiy could be a character from a comic – physically impressive, righteous, clear of purpose and unafraid to use force against the ‘bad guys’; he’s the ultimate vigilante hero.”
 
With drug activity plaguing nations for decades it’s nice to see that some recent advancements are being made to help people throughout the world.  If you are anyone you know is in need of help regarding substance abuse please reach out to us at sfccglobal.org

 

 

 

Leave a comment